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Yin Yang Soup Makes For a Special Coffee Hour

Yin Yang Soup initial Yin Yang Soup intermediate Yin Yang Soup final

East Congregational Church celebrated the Chinese New Year in 2013 (the Year of the Snake).

David Palmer presented an exotic "Yin Yang Soup" for Coffee Hour. This soup was essentially two soups. The darker was a Carrot/Ginger mix. The lighter was a Parsnip/Pear mix. Poured carefully side-by-side into a bowl, the two assumed the classic Yin Yang shape after a deft swirl of the server’s wrist.

David provided the two recipes below:

Pear & Parsnip Soup: Yield 6-8 bowls

Ingredients:

  • 6 large Parsnips
  • 2 large Pears
  • 1 whole Onion
  • 1 can Coconut Milk
  • Water (tcover)
  • Salt ttaste.
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey

Method Of Prep:

  • Peel Parsnips, Pears, Onion. and chop into medium size pieces. Place in a good sized soup pot.
  • Add Coconut Milk, Honey, salt & Water (just to cover main ingredients)
  • Cook on Medium Heat for about 30 minutes, or until a knife pierces fruit with ease.
  • Remove from heat and puree entire mixture until it comes tan even consistency and there are nchunks of fruit left. (You can use a blender for this, or a hand held blender).
  • Serve hot.

Carrot & Ginger Soup: Yield 6-8 Bowls

Ingredients:

  • 8 Large Carrots
  • 1 Ginger Root - 2 inches long (I prefer using half of that)
  • 1 Whole Onion
  • 1 can Coconut Milk
  • 1 Tablespoon Curry Powder
  • Water (to cover)
  • Salt to taste.
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey

Method of Prep:

  • Peel Carrots, Ginger, Onion, and chop into medium size pieces. (Use the back edge of a spoon for Ginger, it's much easier). Place in a good sized soup pot.
  • Add Coconut Milk, Honey, Curry Powder, Salt and Water (just to cover main ingredients).
  • Cook on Medium heat for about 30 minutes, or until knife pierces vegetables with ease.
  • Remove from heat and puree entire mixture until it comes to an even consistency, and there are no chunks of vegetables left. (You can use a blender for this, or a hand held blender).
  • Serve hot.

After the two soups are ready, you need to carefully pour equal amounts of each soup side-by-side into an individual serving bowl (refer to the photos above). Give the bowl a zig-zag swirl. Place a dollop of opposing soup in the appropriate place.

I suggest you practice before serving guests.
:-)
That being said, let me just add a final word or two: when David did it for us it was awesome!


David claims he learned the technique from this (lengthy but thorough) video from the Ashram Kitchen:


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